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Full text search

You can do full text search by using the top search bar. If you search on the Home page, the full text search results will apply to all the sheets that you have access right to. If you search on a specific sheet, the full text search results will only apply to that sheet.

Using the Top Search Bar

The top search bar works like a search engine, which can help you to find full values, while also offering you search suggestions when you begin to type. This is a very useful tool when you are looking for a specific entry where you know at least one of the values.

If you search the data by full text search, the sorting will be according to the correlation to the key word instead that you are not allow to apply different sorting. If you would like to sort your filtered entries, please filter from left sidebar search tool or through field headers instead.

The top search bar cannot be used to search partial data, unless you use regular expressions, which means that you cannot directly search for the last three digits "001" if you have a value such as "1234567001". For this kind of query, you can use the left sidebar search tool or filter through field headers instead.

Top Search Bar Query Syntax

When querying in Ragic, you can write some syntax in the top search bar to combine multiple terms, and use boolean operators to form a more complex query to find specific entries, similar to the google syntax.

You can also modify query terms to provide a wide range of searching options.

Field Search

While doing this, you can search any field by typing the field name followed by a colon ":" and then the term you are looking for.

Boolean Operators

Boolean operators allow terms to be combined through logic operators. Ragic supports AND, "+", OR, NOT and "-" as Boolean operators. Please note that the boolean operators are case-sensitive.

OR

The OR operator is the default conjunction operator. This means that if there is no Boolean operator between two terms, the OR operator is used. The OR operator links two terms and finds a matching entry if either of the terms exist in an entry. The symbol || can be used in place of the word OR.

To search for documents that contain either "customer service", or just "customer" use the query:

"customer service" customer

or

"customer service" OR customer

AND

The AND operator matches documents where both terms exist anywhere in the text of a single entry. The symbol && can be used in place of the word AND.

To search for documents that contain "customer service" and "Service Issues" use the query:

"customer service" AND "Service Issues"

+

The "+" or required operator requires that the term after the "+" symbol exist somewhere in a the field of a single entry.

To search for entries that must contain "customer" and may contain "service" use the query:

+customer service

NOT

The NOT operator excludes entries that contain the term after NOT. The symbol ! can be used in place of the word NOT.

To search for entries that contain "customer service" but not "Service Issues" use the query:

"customer service" NOT "Service Issues"

Note: The NOT operator cannot be used with just one term. For example, the following search will return no results:

NOT "customer service"

-

The "-" or prohibit operator excludes entries that contain the term after the "-" symbol.

To search for entries that contain "customer service" but not "Service Issues" use the query:

"customer service" -"Service Issues"

Wildcard Searches

You can place single and multiple character wildcard searches within single terms (not within phrase queries).

To perform a single character wildcard search, use the "?" symbol.

To perform a multiple character wildcard search, use the "*" symbol.

The single character wildcard search looks for terms that match that with the single character replaced.

For example, to search for "text" or "test" you can use the search

te?t
.

Multiple character wildcard searches looks for 0 or more characters. For example, to search for test, tests or tester, you can use the search

test*
.

You can also use the wildcard searches in the middle of a term, such as

te*t

Note: You cannot use a * or ? symbol as the first character of a search.

Fuzzy Searches

To do a fuzzy search (finding stings that match a pattern approximately, rather than exactly) use the tilde, "~" symbol at the end of a single word term. For example, to search for a term similar in spelling to "roam" use the fuzzy search

roam~
. This search will find terms like foam and roams.

An additional (optional) parameter can specify the required similarity. The value is between 0 and 1, with a value closer to 1 only terms with a higher similarity will be matched. For example:

roam~0.8

The default that is used if the parameter is not given is 0.5.

Proximity Searches

You can find words that are within a specific distance away. To do a proximity search use the tilde, "~", symbol at the end of a phrase. For example, to search for a "customer" and "breakfast" within 10 words of each other in an entry, use the search:

"customer breakfast"~10

Range Searches

Usually, the left sidebar search tool would have options to do a range search for specific field types, such as date fields, but range searches are also supported in Ragic.

Range queries allow one to match entries whose field values are between the lower and upper bound, specified by the range query. Range queries can be inclusive or exclusive of the upper and lower bounds. Sorting is done lexicographically.

Date:[20020101 TO 20030101]

This will find entries whose "Date" field has values between 20020101 and 20030101. These dates would be inclusive to the search. Note that range queries are not only reserved for date fields. You could also use range queries with other fields:

title:{Aida TO Carmen}

This will find all entries whose titles are alphabetically between Aida and Carmen, but not including Aida and Carmen.

Note: Inclusive range queries are denoted by square brackets. Exclusive range queries are denoted by curly brackets.

Boosting a Term

You can boost the relevance level of matching entries, based on the terms found. To boost a term use the caret "^" symbol with a boost factor (a number) at the end of the term you are searching. The higher the boost factor, the more relevant the term will be.

Boosting allows you to control the relevance of an entry by boosting its term. For example, if you are searching for customer service,

and you want the term "customer" to be more relevant, you can boost it using the ^ symbol along with the boost factor next to the term. You can type:

customer^4 service

This will make documents with the term customer appear more relevant. You can also boost Phrase Terms as in the example:

"customer service"^4 "Customer Service"

By default, the boost factor is 1. Although the boost factor must be positive, it can be less than 1 (e.g. 0.2)

Grouping

You can use parentheses to group clauses to form sub queries. This can be very useful if you want to control the boolean logic for a query.

For example, to search for either "customer" or "service" and "address" use the query:

(customer OR service) AND address

This eliminates any confusion, and makes sure that address must exist, and either term customer or service may exist in the resulting entries.

Field Grouping

You can use parentheses to group multiple clauses to a single field.

To search for a title that contains both the word "return" and the phrase "pink panther", use the query:

title:(+return +"pink panther")

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